NY Fringe Festival

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  • Reviews

    NY Review: 'The Art of Painting'

    Written and performed by Mark Chrisler, "The Art of Painting," a Fringe Festival show, is a masterful piece of heady writing about painter Jan Vermeer.

  • Reviews

    NY Review: 'The Women of Spoon River: Their Voices From the Hill'

    Actor-adapter Lee Meriwether's "The Women of Spoon River," a Fringe entry, focuses on the distaff population of Edgar Lee Masters' epitaphs to vivid effect.

  • Reviews

    From Busk Till Dawn: The Life of an NYC Street Performer

    Tim Intravia’s uneven one-man Fringe Festival show, “From Busk Till Dawn,” is based on his seven years making a living as a street performer inTimes Square.

  • Reviews

    A Short Trip

    In Jason Atkinson’s dull Fringe comedy “A Short Trip,” complex religious questions underlie superficial concerns in a story about whether a spouse should take a Roman vacation.

  • Reviews

    Ticket 2 Eternity

    Matthew Ethan Davis’ Fringe show “Ticket 2 Eternity,” a dreamscape about the joys of servitude, is a lively peek into a would-be waiter’s subconscious but lacks coherency.

  • Reviews

    NY Review: 'Night of the Auk'

    Fringe show "Night of the Auk" is a campy revival of Arch Obler's 1956 drama about mankind's first trip to the moon, originally directed by Sidney Lumet.

  • Reviews

    NY Review: 'MisSpelled'

    "Bewitched" heads to the borscht belt in this hokey Fringe tuner from D'Jamin Bartlett and Mark Bornfield about a witch and a nebbishy songwriter.

  • Reviews

    NY Review: 'Right on Target'

    There's a lot of plot but little hilarity in Gary Morgenstein's "Right on Target," a Fringe political comedy about a mixed-race couple in Washington, D.C.

  • Reviews

    Dogs

    “Dogs,” at the Fringe, is a movement-oriented work about a gay Israeli theater director trying to make an all-male musical out of “Romeo and Juliet” with Arab and Jewish actors.

  • Reviews

    Girl in Argentine Landscape

    Though not particularly incisive for a coming-of-age story, “Girl in Argentine Landscape,” at the Fringe, is brought to life with a riveting performance by author Naomi Grossman.