NY Fringe Festival

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  • Reviews

    NY Review: 'Right on Target'

    There's a lot of plot but little hilarity in Gary Morgenstein's "Right on Target," a Fringe political comedy about a mixed-race couple in Washington, D.C.

  • Reviews

    Dogs

    “Dogs,” at the Fringe, is a movement-oriented work about a gay Israeli theater director trying to make an all-male musical out of “Romeo and Juliet” with Arab and Jewish actors.

  • Reviews

    NY Review: 'Tail! Spin!'

    Mario Correa's Fringe concoction "Tail! Spin!" arranges the comments of Larry Craig, Mark Foley, Mark Sanford, and Anthony Weiner for big if cynical laughs.

  • Reviews

    Girl in Argentine Landscape

    Though not particularly incisive for a coming-of-age story, “Girl in Argentine Landscape,” at the Fringe, is brought to life with a riveting performance by author Naomi Grossman.

  • Reviews

    Honest

    DC Moore’s barroom monologue “Honest,” a Fringe show, purports to reanimate the outrage that spawned Occupy Wall Street, but mostly it’s the sour ramblings of an unlikable drunk.

  • Reviews

    NY Review: 'After the Circuit'

    Josh Billig's "After the Circuit," a Fringe Festival show, is overloaded with backstory as it depicts a vaudevillian's struggles during the Depression.

  • Reviews

    Vacuum

    Playwright Arlene Hutton is a bit stymied by her foray into futuristic melodrama with “Vacuum,” a Fringe melodrama about whether or not a cancer cure should be suppressed.

  • Reviews

    #MormoninChief

    In author Matthew Greene’s Fringe show “#MormoninChief,” a Mormon running for president says something provocative in church that a congregant Tweets, but nothing much happens.

  • Reviews

    NY Review: 'Quest for the West: Adventures on the Oregon Trail!'

    Based on the Oregon Trail computer game, "Quest for the West" is a Fringe musical that plays for nostalgic laughs, with promising hints of a deeper story.

  • Reviews

    Oasis: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About the Middle East but Were Afraid to Dance

    A slow, heavy-handed, choreographically repetitive work created by Nejla Y. Yatkin, “Oasis” is nevertheless a lusciously danced exploration of life in the Middle East.