NY Fringe Festival

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  • Reviews

    The Hills Are Alive!

    Frankie Johnson and Eric Thomas Johnson have imagined a hilarious, darkly campy version of what happens after “The Sound of Music” in the Fringe musical “The Hills Are Alive!”

  • Reviews

    20 Somethings

    Evan Sanderson’s “20 Somethings,” a Fringe Festival play about young people seeking a place to belong, is funny and touching though somewhat unoriginal.

  • Reviews

    Becoming Butch

    Vincent James Arcuri’s “Becoming Butch,” a one-man Fringe show, is a familiar gay self-acceptance tale related with such specificity and insight that it’s once again fresh.

  • Reviews

    Chain Reaction

    In conveying the fascinating events behind the creation of the atomic bomb, Jonathan Alexandratos’ the Fringe show “Chain Reaction” unfortunately never settles on a tone.

  • Reviews

    The Apocalypse of John

    In “The Apocalypse of John,” a scatterbrained Fringe comedy from the Serious Theatre Collective, it’s the end of the world at the Players Theatre.

  • Reviews

    REDlight

    Ryan Kipp’s fragmentary “REDlight,” in the Fringe, is a brief collection of monologues linked by Gavin, a hunky young straight guy who works as an erotic dancer in a gay club.

  • Reviews

    Phantomwise

    A thoughtful Fringe Festival play by Oren Stevens, “Phantomwise” is exquisitely performed and concerns Alice Liddell, the real-life inspiration for Lewis Carroll’s famous heroine.

  • Reviews

    LOLPERA

    A new litter of singing and dancing felines hits the stage in Ellen Warkentine and Andrew Pedroza’s hysterical but uneven Fringe opera based on the Internet’s Lolcats photos.

  • Reviews

    Would

    David Marx’s drama “Would,” a Fringe Festival show, digs deeply into the psychology of self-forgiveness in its examination of a young man who was imprisoned for life at age 14.

  • Reviews

    Hanafuda Denki : A Tale of Fantastic Traditional Playing Cards

    A mixture of ghost stories andWeimarcabaret, “Hanafuda Denki,”Tokyo’s Ryuzanji Company’s adaptation of “The Threepenny Opera,” is sometimes inexplicable but always delightful.