Advice

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  • Advice

    Playing Young

    "I can knock 10 years off anyone still playing teens. I used to call myself America's oldest teenager," says actor and standup comic Gina Rodgers.

  • Advice

    Victor Melendez

    Victor Melendez has wanted to be an actor since the 1970s, but life kept getting in the way. Financial and family responsibilities took precedence, and he had to "put acting on hold 99 percent of the time," he says.

  • Advice

    Recovery and Starting My Own Theater Company

    I was broke and constantly in pain. Then, to make matters worse, the bottom fell out of the economy and auditions became scarcer. "Something has to change," I thought.

  • Advice

    Paranoia, Phonies and 'Phrauds'

    When my visibility went from 'that guy behind the audition table' to Paul Russell, I fully realized just how cautious actors are about relatively unknown casting and other opportunities.

  • Advice

    Don't Ask, Don't Tell

    There is one part of their true being that actors never, ever reveal. They guard this truth with all their might. Not even Jack Bauer could get them to confess it. Yes, I'm talking about an actor's age.

  • Advice

    Welcome. Now Stop Working.

    I was told that I was not allowed to accept any nonunion work whatsoever, even if it wasn't officially under AFTRA's jurisdiction.

  • Advice

    Just Say No

    Wait a minute, you say. These sound like reasonable expenses. Why aren't they valid? Simple. All the above expenses aren't deductible because everyone has them.

  • Advice

    When Does An Actor Need a Financial Planner?

    "Immediately! Anyone who is devoting his or her life to a career like acting, in which 2.5 percent of those trained in it make their living at it, needs financial planning." -- Erin Burns

  • Advice

    Don't Be a $tarving Arti$t

    Once my clients begin generating substantial income, I have another job as well: advising them on how to protect their assets and avoid pitfalls that may deplete their wealth.

  • Advice

    Irene Park

    After working for four years in New York for "corporate America," Irene Park decided to return to Los Angeles and pursue her true love.