Advice

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  • Advice

    On the Chi

    As an actor, you literally put your whole body into the work of performing: physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually.

  • Advice

    #ICastIt 1 Click That Led David Heredia to the Hidden Talent on Backstage

    Small animation studio owner David Heredia shares how he found voiceover talent to elevate his animations and why it's important to follow every detail of the submission instructions.

  • Advice

    To Wait or Not to Wait for a Job in China

    Michael Kostroff reminds readers that nothing is anything until it's something -- even a job in China.

  • Advice

    Adam Suzuki...Got the Part

    The story told in "La Sierva" was what interested Adam Suzuki when he saw the notice on BackStage.com in June 2011.

  • Advice

    Follow Awards Season With the Oscars Mobile App

    Looking at this year’s official iOS Academy Award app, titled Oscar Experience, you might wish you’d stayed at home with Netflix or even gone to the theater instead.

  • Advice

    Looking Back, Moving On

    If you've auditioned for a commercial in Los Angeles at any time in the past 28 years, you've likely been in Danny Goldman's office.

  • Advice

    Going Mic-less

    Under theater conditions, the unenhanced power of the human voice has been severely challenged since, well, probably 1964, when Carol Channing was amplified in "Hello, Dolly!"

  • Advice

    Johnny Ferretti...Got the Part

    Know your "type" and submit only when appropriate are basic rules every actor should follow, yet many do not. Fortunately for Johnny Ferretti, he has made these rules the foundation of his pursuit of acting.

  • Advice

    Singing Their Hearts Out

    "The challenge in doing a Stephen Sondheim show is that the bar is raised so high," says Aaron Lazar, who plays the buffoonish Count Carl-Magnus Malcolm in the Broadway revival of "A Little Night Music."

  • Advice

    How Failure Worked for Me

    For years I had a deeply personal secret. Only family and acquaintances I knew from the era of bell-bottom pants and Ford Pintos were aware of my shame: I failed seventh grade.