Financial Advice

Sort by:

  • Advice

    Don't Cheat Yourself or the IRS

    Every year, we are confronted by actors who either didn't know about or simply disregarded the advice to keep their receipts and records.

  • Advice

    If You Hear From the IRS

    Everybody dreads getting mail from the Internal Revenue Service. If you do, never hesitate to open it. You would be surprised how many taxpayers put the envelope aside out of fear.

  • Advice

    Bargains in New York

    Even when the economy is good, actors can use bargains. Here are some favorites of the Back Stage staff.

  • Advice

    Taking Control

    Welcome to the Actor's Finance Workshop. For the next eight weeks, this column will explore the basics of personal finance.

  • Advice

    Budgeting Your Movie

    For an actor, New York is one of the best cities on earth. It’s also one of the most expensive. Professionals in the business suggest saving three months’ worth of expenses before moving here, particularly if you don’t yet have a job or a place to live.

  • Advice

    A Tax Credit That May Cost You

    Tax credits are supposed to save you money, but thanks to one created in 2009, your refund may be reduced this year, or worse, you may actually owe money on your tax return.

  • Advice

    Intaxication

    Obviously, all taxpayers are looking for a refund, and all too frequently they are willing to be creative to get one. Here are some cautionary tales from years of experience.

  • Advice

    Radical Solutions

    The acting world is not a kind one. Variations in income are a regular fact of life. But what if your steady but variable income takes a big hit? Like in half. How do you address that?

  • Advice

    Saving for a Rainy Day

    You have to pay your agent 10 percent and your manager 10 percent; why not 10 percent for yourself as well? Take that money right off the top and put it away for a rainy day.

  • Advice

    Reporting Your Income

    One of the most important forms you will need for filing your taxes is your W-2 form. Your employer is required by law to provide you with a statement of your earnings and taxes withheld. This statement comes in the form of a W-2, which must be provided to you ...