Casting Advice

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  • Advice

    #ICastIt 1 Reason to Wait for the Right Fit

    George Daileda explains why staying open to whatever an actor might bring to a project has paid off with casting his Web series about cosplayers, "Three Days of Glory."

  • Advice

    2 Reasons Why ‘Edgar & Annabel’ Was a Perfect Fit for The Poor Theatre

    Will Crouse, artistic director and one of the founders of The Poor Theatre, shares insight on forming a company and casting theater in Chicago.

  • Advice

    #ICastIt: 1 Reason Less is More in Acting

    The "29 Palms" writer-director talks about casting the trailer for his new film and why sometimes understated is better if you want the part.

  • Advice

    Changing Your Look?

    "I open someone's headshot online and I see a multitude of hair colors...and I don't know which girl I'm bringing in," says longtime L.A. casting director Ava Shevitt.

  • Advice

    How to Lose an Agent and Manager in 10 Minutes

    The agent warned the actor, "I don't like the way this relationship is developing between us. This is not something I'm comfortable with."

  • Advice

    Being Real

    All casting directors talk about the importance of a headshot looking like the actor, but this is essential for actors interested in appearing in independent films.

  • Advice

    The Ugly of Our Trade

    Sue reminded me of the harsh realities of our trade: If the actors were not making money for the company or, as in Peter's case, not an easy sell, then it only made sense to let them go.

  • Advice

    Emily Schweber on ‘Dream’ Casting

    Emily Schweber shares the excitement of putting together a "dream" cast of actors in their 60s-80s for Brett Haley's "I'll See You in My Dreams" starring Blythe Danner.

  • Advice

    Magic in the Chair

    If actors come with the goods to create the miracle in the chair, then they'll be forgiven for their lack of experience and knowledge about the proper way to do auditions.

  • Advice

    Is 'Beautiful' the New 'Ugly'?

    The headshot is the passport into the casting director's office. It has to say something about who the actor is. A pretty headshot does not always serve the actor in terms of getting an audition.