Casting Advice

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  • Advice

    An Actor's Most Guarded Secret

    Actors often get round-a-bout questions in auditions by the hiring personnel who hold an interest for discovering an artist's age.

  • Advice

    An Actor's Career-Destroying Screw-Up

    We all make mistakes. But I'm still surprised by the career-destroying screw-ups that some actors will willingly and without-thought-to-consequences make.

  • Advice

    Pass the Remote

    One might say that G. Charles Wright has spent his whole life preparing for a job in casting. "All my childhood was spent in front of a television instead of playing outdoors or doing homework," he says.

  • Advice

    Risk Management

    Robin Lippin initially imagined her move to L.A. as temporary. Two decades and dozens of casting gigs later, Lippin still calls Hollywood home.

  • Advice

    Changing Your Look?

    "I open someone's headshot online and I see a multitude of hair colors...and I don't know which girl I'm bringing in," says longtime L.A. casting director Ava Shevitt.

  • Advice

    Acting Job Opportunities Lost and Won

    This actor knew that here was an opportunity to introduce himself to gate keepers. He was right to begin a conversation. Where did he go wrong?

  • Advice

    Thinking Outside the Box

    Barbara McNamara, who has headed her own company in New York, Barbara McNamara Casting, for four years, casts films, TV shows, commercials, voiceovers, and industrials.

  • Advice

    Scout's Honor

    "Be prepared. You've heard it a million times, but it still slays me that actors think it's okay to walk in unprepared."

  • Advice

    Casting Director Accountability

    The response to my blog post "A Casting Director's Rude Behavior," which was characterized by Back Stage as "chastising," was overwhelming.

  • Advice

    Acting Nuts

    Often when I venture upon this acting avenue with thespians—viewing what acting skills they have to show—the first presentation foray is just that: presentation.