LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    A Good Smoke

    I couldn't help but feel that Don Cumming's self-directed piece was simply a faster, more accessible version ofLong Day's Journey Into Night.

  • Reviews

    Closer

    Patrick Marber's incisive, dramatically piercing, savagely funny 1997 script has been described as "a sexual square dance" of four characters who repeatedly change romantic partners¿a process aided by a complex structure that moves back and forth through time.

  • Reviews

    Tunnel Visions

    This 60-minute, three-act world premiere offers a trilogy of interlinked stories using the same two characters, Emma and Sean (Meredith Zealy and Ron Geren). These two lonely hearts keep meeting, by chance, at the same bar; however, at each encounter, they are totally different characters, and only their names are ...

  • Reviews

    Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

    Presented by and at the Geffen Playhouse, 10886 Le Conte Ave., Westwood. Tue.-Thu. 7:30 p.m., Fri. 8 p.m., Sat. 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun. 2 & 7 p.m. Nov. 16-Dec. 18. (310) 208-5454.

  • Reviews

    Sister Cities

    This two-act drama of four estranged sisters-with different personalities, lifestyles, and fathers, reunited by the suicide of their terminally ill mother-was conceived and written by Circus Theatricals company member Colette Freedman.

  • Reviews

    The Crumple Zone

    A smart blend of the conventions of witty sex comedy with poignant reflections on longing and loneliness in gay relationships.

  • Reviews

    Reefer Madness, The Musical

    Based on the Z-grade 1936 morality film warning parents of the dangers of "the leafy green assassin," Kevin Murphy and Dan Studney's musical version, which opened Off-Broadway in 2001, is an absolute hoot.

  • Reviews

    Gaslight

    Though the 1944 George Cukor film version is generally considered a classic, this long-winded tale of extreme mental cruelty, and worse, hasn't aged well.

  • Reviews

    St. Joan and the Dancing Sickness

    Somewhere in rural Louisiana in 1999, a community is forced to face up to the cruelty and corruption of its state government.

  • Reviews

    Never Land

    In writer-director Phyllis Nagy’s unnerving 1998 tragicomedy the playwright explores ennui and tensions emanating from European class and cultural differences and within family relationships.