LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    Twist

    The young heroes and heroines of Charles Dickens' novels are invariably subjected to terrible trials and tribulations, but until now nobody ever suggested that the characters enjoyed it.

  • Reviews

    Henry V

    Rarely have Shakespeare's other historical dramas reached the grandeur of this one, the Bard's portrayal of "good King Harry," the Lancastrian monarch who won the Battle of Agincourt.

  • Reviews

    The Taming of the Shrew

    Shakespeare's classic comedy didn't need to be set in the postwar Italy of 1948 to showcase its biggest laughs. But in doing so, director Carl Reggiardo is able to ratchet up the slapstick in this under-the-stars staging.

  • Reviews

    Still Photos

    Elements of this memory play are well-conceived and well-staged. The intertwining of past and present is structured seamlessly, as a grandmother relives her doomed love affair with another woman.

  • Reviews

    Freezing Antarctica

    "Standing on your head, anything is possible-in freezing Antarctica." Bill Sterritt frequently uses this refrain in his quirky play, which he also directs.

  • Reviews

    Henry IV, Part I

    The balance of the production is uneven. When Hal and Falstaff are off stage, much of the energy drops.

  • Reviews

    'Nami

    Playwright Chad Beckim's piece on the sale of children in the sex-slave market builds with genuine tension but reaches a gory climax that is arbitrary and strains credulity.

  • Reviews

    Prove It on Me

    Directed by Kelly Ann Ford, the story, though, predictable, might have worked, if not for an abundance of clichéd dialogue and a supporting performance that knocks the show's overall quality down another few notches.

  • Reviews

    Desperate Writers

    There is potential hilarity in the trials and tribulations of Hollywood writers who battle with capricious studio executives, but the storytellers should set a consistent comedic style.

  • Reviews

    Respect: The Girl Em-Powered Musical

    Vanderbilt professor Dorothy Marcic has avoided many obvious theatrical and political pitfalls in her survey of women in popular music in 20th-century America.