LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    Omnium Gatherum

    This eloquent, funny, provocative riff on 9/11 and its aftermath, by Theresa Rebeck and Alexandra Gersten-Vassilaros, gets a bang-up production by directors Ellen Geer and Rob Walker and the terrific Theatricum ensemble.

  • Reviews

    Second Thoughts

    "Second Thoughts," presented by the city of West Hollywood and Bare Bones Theatre at the Great Hall, Plummer Park, 7377 Santa Monica Blvd., West Hollywood. Fri.-Sat. 7 p.m., Sun. 3 p.m. Oct. 22-Nov. 13. $15-20. (323) 461-5570.

  • Reviews

    Jackson Frost

    All of the performances were so exquisitely alive, the arts of listening and unselfconscious participation so in full use, that this had to be one of those heightened evenings that result from offstage exigencies.

  • Reviews

    How I Ruined Everything

    Presented by and at Eclectic Company Theatre, 5312 Laurel Canyon Blvd., North Hollywood. Fri.-Sat. 8 p.m. Jan. 13-Feb. 18. (818) 508-3003.

  • Reviews

    The Awakening

    ¿We need a new attitude,¿ says Joshua (Derek Shaun), a young, black college grad who returns to his roots, his tough hood, to set up business and try to make a difference. This is in contrast to his best friend, John (Damon Christopher), a young black dentist who moves out ...

  • Reviews

    Feed

    Structurally speaking, what is more inherently dramatic than an old-fashioned courtroom drama? And if you've got a clever playwright who can give audiences the old rhetorical one-two punch, all the better.

  • Reviews

    Twist

    The young heroes and heroines of Charles Dickens' novels are invariably subjected to terrible trials and tribulations, but until now nobody ever suggested that the characters enjoyed it.

  • Reviews

    Henry V

    Rarely have Shakespeare's other historical dramas reached the grandeur of this one, the Bard's portrayal of "good King Harry," the Lancastrian monarch who won the Battle of Agincourt.

  • Reviews

    Bush Is Bad: Alaska Beauty Queen Edition

    Fair and balanced? Definitely not. Composer and lyricist Joshua Rosenblum puts W. squarely in his sights and unleashes a withering blast of satire in this musical revue.

  • Reviews

    The Taming of the Shrew

    Shakespeare's classic comedy didn't need to be set in the postwar Italy of 1948 to showcase its biggest laughs. But in doing so, director Carl Reggiardo is able to ratchet up the slapstick in this under-the-stars staging.