LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    Desperate Writers

    There is potential hilarity in the trials and tribulations of Hollywood writers who battle with capricious studio executives, but the storytellers should set a consistent comedic style.

  • Reviews

    Respect: The Girl Em-Powered Musical

    Vanderbilt professor Dorothy Marcic has avoided many obvious theatrical and political pitfalls in her survey of women in popular music in 20th-century America.

  • Reviews

    Gaslight

    Though the 1944 George Cukor film version is generally considered a classic, this long-winded tale of extreme mental cruelty, and worse, hasn't aged well.

  • Reviews

    St. Joan and the Dancing Sickness

    Somewhere in rural Louisiana in 1999, a community is forced to face up to the cruelty and corruption of its state government.

  • Reviews

    Never Land

    In writer-director Phyllis Nagy’s unnerving 1998 tragicomedy the playwright explores ennui and tensions emanating from European class and cultural differences and within family relationships.

  • Reviews

    Back to Babylon

    In this self-crafted solo show, Gregg Tomé starts and ends as a man who refuses to attend his 10-year high school reunion but then spends his increasingly inebriated evening recalling many of his friends.

  • Reviews

    Garden of Reason

    Press materials for the new version ofGarden of Reasonsay it's Pink Floyd's "The Wall" meets Cirque du Soleil.

  • Reviews

    How I Ruined Everything

    Presented by and at Eclectic Company Theatre, 5312 Laurel Canyon Blvd., North Hollywood. Fri.-Sat. 8 p.m. Jan. 13-Feb. 18. (818) 508-3003.

  • Reviews

    The Awakening

    ¿We need a new attitude,¿ says Joshua (Derek Shaun), a young, black college grad who returns to his roots, his tough hood, to set up business and try to make a difference. This is in contrast to his best friend, John (Damon Christopher), a young black dentist who moves out ...

  • Reviews

    Feed

    Structurally speaking, what is more inherently dramatic than an old-fashioned courtroom drama? And if you've got a clever playwright who can give audiences the old rhetorical one-two punch, all the better.