LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    Dialectics of the Heart

    The word "dialectic" is defined here as the struggle between opposites, and that couldn't be more the case when 端ber-rigid academic Elizabeth Drewer (Sharon Lawrence) falls hard for her hot-blooded young teaching assistant Richard Amado (Nicholas Gonzalez).

  • Reviews

    'Nami

    Playwright Chad Beckim's piece on the sale of children in the sex-slave market builds with genuine tension but reaches a gory climax that is arbitrary and strains credulity.

  • Reviews

    Gaslight

    Though the 1944 George Cukor film version is generally considered a classic, this long-winded tale of extreme mental cruelty, and worse, hasn't aged well.

  • Reviews

    St. Joan and the Dancing Sickness

    Somewhere in rural Louisiana in 1999, a community is forced to face up to the cruelty and corruption of its state government.

  • Reviews

    Never Land

    In writer-director Phyllis Nagy’s unnerving 1998 tragicomedy the playwright explores ennui and tensions emanating from European class and cultural differences and within family relationships.

  • Reviews

    Jackson Frost

    All of the performances were so exquisitely alive, the arts of listening and unselfconscious participation so in full use, that this had to be one of those heightened evenings that result from offstage exigencies.

  • Reviews

    The Playground

    Few musicals in recent years have been more frustrating than this one. The subject matter-homeless youth-is compelling.

  • Reviews

    Twist

    The young heroes and heroines of Charles Dickens' novels are invariably subjected to terrible trials and tribulations, but until now nobody ever suggested that the characters enjoyed it.

  • Reviews

    Third

    The late Wasserstein left a legacy of intelligent plays. In this one, her final work, she fashioned a piece that's absorbing -- funny, poignant, and cerebral -- but regrettably bogged down by dramaturgic contrivances that compromise its impact

  • Reviews

    Henry V

    Rarely have Shakespeare's other historical dramas reached the grandeur of this one, the Bard's portrayal of "good King Harry," the Lancastrian monarch who won the Battle of Agincourt.