LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    Portrait of Ten Women

    Garcia is intent upon exploding the hundreds of ill-informed, often life-threatening myths about AIDS, and here her script is at its most devastating.

  • Reviews

    In the Heart of America

    How many ways are there to say "war is hell"? Naomi Wallace, by taking on the last few conflagrations, comes up with a plethora of suggestions.

  • Reviews

    My Fair Lady

    O'Hare gives a performance appropriate to a stage the size of the Ahmanson's and to a 30-seat house, detailed and subtle yet visible to all.

  • Reviews

    Three By Mee: Part 2, The Bacchae

    Charles Mee's reinvention of Euripides' cosmic battle of nature and civilization, of gods and man, is enacted with a stinging contemporary edge.

  • Reviews

    Defiance

    This is the second play in John Patrick Shanley'sDoubttrilogy. LikeDoubt, which focuses on an intolerant and judgmental nun,Defianceconcentrates on a religious figure: a Lutheran Marine chaplain whose arrogance and lack of doubt make him a moral absolutist.

  • Reviews

    Black Watch

    The play is in itself a contradiction in terms: It's an anti-war -- or at any rate anti-Iraq War -- play, but it's rooted in love for the military and regimental pride, lifting it out of cliché and anchoring it in ambiguity.

  • Reviews

    Otello

    The performers here are quite operatic in voice, some more marvelously than others. But modern audiences increasingly expect a little acting with their opera.

  • Reviews

    Rose's Dilemma

    Neil Simon has created a sadly flat excursion into the lives and afterlives of fairly unexceptional people in this 2003 play.

  • Reviews

    The Julio Brothers

    In Gino Aquino and Lance Petersen's one-act play, theJulio Brothersare a trio of Rochester, N.Y., siblings who flunk out of a thriving career as drug dealers and decide to give the legit world a try.

  • Reviews

    Mercury Fur

    The U.S. premiere of British playwright Philip Ridley's 2005 shocker unfolds like a muted nightmare set in a vaguely defined near-future time when lawlessness is the order of the day. Two