LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    Closer

    Patrick Marber's incisive, dramatically piercing, savagely funny 1997 script has been described as "a sexual square dance" of four characters who repeatedly change romantic partners¿a process aided by a complex structure that moves back and forth through time.

  • Reviews

    The Submission and The Future Is in Eggs

    Ionesco and Astroturf--what a happy thing. In mounting two of Eugène Ionesco's lesser-known (and pre-Rhinoceros) works, Zoo District's Kristi Webber and a top-notch cast have given an old absurdist a new, decidedly retro infusion of hipster chic and manic energy.

  • Reviews

    Art

    The three-man cast plays the piece with unpretentious precision and considerable flair, and they effectively capture the play's understated comedy.

  • Reviews

    Stages

    Initially, Abigail Rose Solomon¿sStageswas created as a 90-minute one-act play. But an intermission was added late during the rehearsal process.

  • Reviews

    The Playground

    Few musicals in recent years have been more frustrating than this one. The subject matter-homeless youth-is compelling.

  • Reviews

    Jackson Frost

    All of the performances were so exquisitely alive, the arts of listening and unselfconscious participation so in full use, that this had to be one of those heightened evenings that result from offstage exigencies.

  • Reviews

    How I Ruined Everything

    Presented by and at Eclectic Company Theatre, 5312 Laurel Canyon Blvd., North Hollywood. Fri.-Sat. 8 p.m. Jan. 13-Feb. 18. (818) 508-3003.

  • Reviews

    The Awakening

    ¿We need a new attitude,¿ says Joshua (Derek Shaun), a young, black college grad who returns to his roots, his tough hood, to set up business and try to make a difference. This is in contrast to his best friend, John (Damon Christopher), a young black dentist who moves out ...

  • Reviews

    Feed

    Structurally speaking, what is more inherently dramatic than an old-fashioned courtroom drama? And if you've got a clever playwright who can give audiences the old rhetorical one-two punch, all the better.

  • Reviews

    The Taming of the Shrew

    Shakespeare's classic comedy didn't need to be set in the postwar Italy of 1948 to showcase its biggest laughs. But in doing so, director Carl Reggiardo is able to ratchet up the slapstick in this under-the-stars staging.