LA Theater Review

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  • Reviews

    Forbidden Broadway: Special Victims Unit

    All bets for sacred-cow Broadway musicals and their stars to escape unscathed are off. Since 1982, writer-director Gerard Alessandrini has been updating his inspired Off-Broadway series, which serves up tough-love spoofs of the genre he adores.

  • Reviews

    Lady K is on the Mic

    What gives this solo performance its engaging quality is author-actor Kim Blackwell's equal-opportunity honesty. For audiences of all ethnicities, her comments make for an enlighteningly enjoyable evening.

  • Reviews

    Black Watch

    The play is in itself a contradiction in terms: It's an anti-war -- or at any rate anti-Iraq War -- play, but it's rooted in love for the military and regimental pride, lifting it out of cliché and anchoring it in ambiguity.

  • Reviews

    Otello

    The performers here are quite operatic in voice, some more marvelously than others. But modern audiences increasingly expect a little acting with their opera.

  • Reviews

    Rose's Dilemma

    Neil Simon has created a sadly flat excursion into the lives and afterlives of fairly unexceptional people in this 2003 play.

  • Reviews

    Into The Woods

    Emblematic of ongoing human suffering throughout history, this Stephen Sondheim musical is as relevant today as the timeless fairy tales on which it is based.

  • Reviews

    Gulliver's Travels

    This 'Gulliver's Travels' is firing on all cylinders. Josh Zeller's sharp adaptation, the creative multimedia effects, and the fun costumes; P. Adam Walsh's snappy direction; and a remarkably versatile cast, headed by Keythe Farley, are ideal.

  • Reviews

    The Immigrant

    This handsome and enjoyable production packs an emotional punch.

  • Reviews

    The Underpants

    Comedy is sticky-wicket business. It gets even trickier when 100 years pass and translation is involved.

  • Reviews

    The Value of Names

    Playwright Sweet is far too experienced to opt for easy answers, reminding us that in one of America's darkest hours, the line between villain and victim could be entertainingly murky.