LA Theater Review

Sort by:

  • Reviews

    Still Photos

    Elements of this memory play are well-conceived and well-staged. The intertwining of past and present is structured seamlessly, as a grandmother relives her doomed love affair with another woman.

  • Reviews

    Freezing Antarctica

    "Standing on your head, anything is possible-in freezing Antarctica." Bill Sterritt frequently uses this refrain in his quirky play, which he also directs.

  • Reviews

    Henry IV, Part I

    The balance of the production is uneven. When Hal and Falstaff are off stage, much of the energy drops.

  • Reviews

    Jackson Frost

    All of the performances were so exquisitely alive, the arts of listening and unselfconscious participation so in full use, that this had to be one of those heightened evenings that result from offstage exigencies.

  • Reviews

    Third

    The late Wasserstein left a legacy of intelligent plays. In this one, her final work, she fashioned a piece that's absorbing -- funny, poignant, and cerebral -- but regrettably bogged down by dramaturgic contrivances that compromise its impact

  • Reviews

    The Playground

    Few musicals in recent years have been more frustrating than this one. The subject matter-homeless youth-is compelling.

  • Reviews

    Bush Is Bad: Alaska Beauty Queen Edition

    Fair and balanced? Definitely not. Composer and lyricist Joshua Rosenblum puts W. squarely in his sights and unleashes a withering blast of satire in this musical revue.

  • Reviews

    The Time Machine

    Until Julian Bane and Phil Abatecola clicked on to their laptops, no one had attempted a stage version of this far-reaching fantasy. This ill-fated version doesn't bid fair to be the one that breaks down any barriers.

  • Reviews

    Lady K is on the Mic

    What gives this solo performance its engaging quality is author-actor Kim Blackwell's equal-opportunity honesty. For audiences of all ethnicities, her comments make for an enlighteningly enjoyable evening.

  • Reviews

    Putting It Together

    As a black-tie party in a Manhattan skyscraper progresses and everyone drinks a little too much, intimate secrets emerge as the characters confront their lives and ambitions.