New York Theater

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  • Reviews

    Party Time

    Though brief -- running under 60 minutes --Party Timepacks more of an emotional and intellectual punch than many plays running two or three times as long.

  • Reviews

    Karen Mason

    Mason has a voice roughly the cabaret equivalent of a 9030T series John Deere tractor. When she lets it go, the only thing for a patron to do is get out of its way.

  • Reviews

    Mixed Tape 2007

    The concept forMixed Tape 2007is interesting. One playwright writes a short play, then a second scribe takes one character from this scene and writes her own short play.

  • Reviews

    The Orestia

    In David Johnston's freewheeling adaptation, the playwright has condensed the famed Greek tragedy of supreme familial dysfunction into a mere two hours.

  • Reviews

    3 Sisters

    In addition to a daunting three-hour running time in a teeny-tiny theatre, the pace of this particular production lapses with annoying frequency.

  • Reviews

    Moonlight

    The genius of Harold Pinter is his ability to take commonplace situations and ordinary people, then warp their world with a hyper-realistic, often illogical theatricality.

  • Reviews

    Griot: He Who Speaks The Sweet Word

    More than mere storytelling,Griot: He Who Speaks the Sweet Wordbrilliantly enlightens and uplifts as it dramatizes the history of Africans in America through the beat, the word, and lots of creativity. Subtitled "a choreopoem," it skillfully weaves music, movement, and text, beginning with "the beat as the transportation system ...

  • Reviews

    Passing Strange

    Passing Strange, which opened Off-Broadway May 14, isn't in the running for a Tony Award, and for the favorites, this is good news.

  • Reviews

    The Unusual Suspects

    Unapologetic silliness — much of it quite funny — runs rampant through the musical whodunitThe Unusual Suspects.

  • Reviews

    Henry V

    Watching the magnetic energy and smart staging brought to this rendering of Shakespeare's buoyant history is like being courtside at a great basketball game—and there's great language to boot.