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  • Reviews

    THE PIANO TEACHER

    at South Coast Repertory

  • Reviews

    HONOUR

    A reprehensibly Hollywood thought enters one's mind when actor Susan Sullivan first appears onstage in this Joanna Murray-Smith play: "Wow, she looks great." There's that lithe bearing, glowing skin, and lustrous hair. But then her seems-to-have-it-all character—a lovely, witty former poet named Honor—is dumped by her ...

  • Reviews

    THEY SHOOT MEXICANS, DON'T THEY?

    This mixed-media piece, written by Theresa Chavez and Rose Portillo (who also performs along with Michael Manuel), explores in music, video, and performance the stereotypes of Mexicans and other Latin Americans that were created by Hollywood in its early years.

  • Reviews

    DAMES AT SEA

    Conventional wisdom has it that formulaic characters and stories lead to insufferable hokum. But the corn can be golden when it's infused with wry wit and a strong affection for cherished entertainment styles of yesteryear. This 1968 Off-Broadway tuner mines the conventions of 1930s movie musicals for an ebullient ...

  • Reviews

    Boise

    Presented by Rattlestick Playwrights Theater, casting by Stephanie Klapper Casting, 224 Waverly Place, NYC, June 14-July 18.

  • Reviews

    BLITHE SPIRIT

    at the Will Geer Theatricum

  • Reviews

    Altar Boyz

    Presented by Ken Davenport & Robyn Goodman in association with Walt Grossman, Ruth Hendel, Sharon Karmazin, Matt Murphy, and Mark Shacket, casting by David Caparelliotis, at Dodger Stages, 340 W. 50 St., NYC. Opened March 1 for an open run.

  • Reviews

    A HOLIDAY CHRISTMAS

    Whether pedestrian or bizarre, art is, despite the protest of those creating it, still a product. And if said product doesn't attract willing consumers, it becomes increasingly difficult for an artistic company to survive long enough to fulfill its mission. Such may be the case with Crazy Eddie's ...

  • Reviews

    SOME EXPLICIT POLAROIDS

    It's no surprise that Rude Guerrilla Theater Company has once again tapped into Mark Ravenhill's dark, edgy repertoire. Having already found success with the British playwright's raw, sexually charged work, this intrepid company knows that beneath the shocking surface of his satire are universal themes that will ...

  • Reviews

    THE MAIDS

    Deciding to launch a theatrical production company with a play by Jean Genet must presage some kind of artistic death wish, second only to casting oneself as Hamlet. Luckily the brave souls who present this mounting of a remarkably difficult classic are well up to the task. Led by director ...