Reviews

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  • Reviews

    She Always Told Me

    Actor-playwright Annie Mebane has written 12 vignettes for herself and three performers on the wide-ranging subject of "the societal role of women in American culture."

  • Reviews

    Arlington

    There are countless clarion calls to end war and warring these days, a message repeated endlessly in the hope that someone at the top of the power grid will listen to what the people have to say. Some of these statements are obvious and harshly stated, but Garry Michael White ...

  • Reviews

    Moonlight

    The genius of Harold Pinter is his ability to take commonplace situations and ordinary people, then warp their world with a hyper-realistic, often illogical theatricality.

  • Reviews

    Ineffable

    They pull the entire audience onstage for a group photo, they pratfall, they execute stylized choreography to witty musical choices, and yet the show is over too soon.

  • Reviews

    Steal Away: The Living History of Harriet Tubman

    The play unfolds Tubman's memories, sweetly showing that there are good and bad people no matter our race or gender. But Balian's direction lacks an imagination.

  • Reviews

    A Better Life

    Carlos dreams of a better future for himself and his teenage son, Luis, who is finding himself pulled increasingly closer into gang activity as he distances himself from his father.

  • Reviews

    Henry V

    Watching the magnetic energy and smart staging brought to this rendering of Shakespeare's buoyant history is like being courtside at a great basketball game—and there's great language to boot.

  • Reviews

    Sunshine Cleaning

    Though the premise is morbid, the quirky Sunshine Cleaning left a bright spot on my mind, thanks to the fine performances by Amy Adams and Emily Blunt as sisters who, despite not seeing eye-to-eye, become business partners in a cut-rate cleaning service that caters to tidying up after bloody accidents ...

  • Reviews

    State of Play

    When Brad Pitt drops out of a major motion picture just four days before production is set to begin, it could be a complete disaster. But in the case of State of Play, it turned out to be a blessing — mainly because replacement star Russell Crowe has turned in his ...

  • Reviews

    An Englishman in New York

    A sequel to 1975's The Naked Civil Servant, this film once again stars John Hurt as gay pioneer Quentin Crisp. An Englishman in New York documents Crisp's fluctuating fortunes after he moved from Britain to New York City soon after the first film (and the book it was ...