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  • Reviews

    Harps and Angels

    "Harps and Angels," conceived by Jack Viertel and directed by Jerry Zaks, is the latest attempt to find a simpatico fit between Randy Newman's witty philosophical musings and the creative vernacular of stage musicals.

  • Reviews

    Burlesque

    A game cast led by Cher and Christina Aguilera; nifty production designs; sharp, flashy choreography; and good songs make this tuner a surprising guilty pleasure.

  • Reviews

    The Temperamentals

    Gay artists are reclaiming their history. Like "Milk," Jon Marans has done something similar for Harry Hay in his bright and affecting new play, "The Temperamentals."

  • Reviews

    Pound

    Ezra Pound, the influential American poet accused of treason during World War II but never tried, finally gets his chance for a jury verdict in "Pound," written and directed by William Roetzheim.

  • Reviews

    Carved in Stone

    This loony, crazy quilt of a play by late gay playwright Jeffrey Hartgraves is set in a strange sort of limbo where a group of gay writers and icons have taken up residence.

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    Darling

    The most memorable moments in "Darling," the new dance-theatre piece by choreographer Sam Kim, are the many entrances and exits of its four dancers.

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    State of Play

    When Brad Pitt drops out of a major motion picture just four days before production is set to begin, it could be a complete disaster. But in the case of State of Play, it turned out to be a blessing — mainly because replacement star Russell Crowe has turned in his ...

  • Reviews

    An Englishman in New York

    A sequel to 1975's The Naked Civil Servant, this film once again stars John Hurt as gay pioneer Quentin Crisp. An Englishman in New York documents Crisp's fluctuating fortunes after he moved from Britain to New York City soon after the first film (and the book it was ...

  • Reviews

    Is He Dead?

    Once you get past the fact that this "new" 1898 play by Mark Twain is receiving its West Coast premiere 111 years after it was written, its tale of the European art scene circa the mid-19th century is quite strikingly contemporary.