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  • Reviews

    Putting It Together

    As a black-tie party in a Manhattan skyscraper progresses and everyone drinks a little too much, intimate secrets emerge as the characters confront their lives and ambitions.

  • Reviews

    Anonymous

    Screenwriter John Orloff tried to get his story about a fraudulent Shakespeare on the screen for 15 years, but that other movie (yes, "Shakespeare in Love") stood in the way.

  • Reviews

    Knickerbocker

    A play consisting of nothing but two-person conversations in the same restaurant booth could be static, but this is a moving and funny rumination on fatherhood.

  • Reviews

    FALLING UPWARD!

    It begins on gossamer hopes, with sentimental language and an otherworldly look. But somewhere along this theatrical journey, meant to be a sweet fable of mutual understanding and good fellowship, matters devolve into the very stereotyping and name-calling it purports to abhor. Certainly this microcosm, created by playwright Ray Bradbury ...

  • Reviews

    VILLAGE WOOING

    It would be hard to find two more delightful and captivating commentaries on the dance between the sexes, both plays perfectly sized for their wit to work without cloying. The shared premise of these one-acts, featuring one couple apiece, is that the sexes will never know each other much better ...

  • Reviews

    3 Sisters

    In addition to a daunting three-hour running time in a teeny-tiny theatre, the pace of this particular production lapses with annoying frequency.

  • Reviews

    THE WOODEN BREEKS

    Wooden breeks is Scottish slang for wooden britches—in other words, a casket. It's an apt title for Glen Berger's mysterious dark comedy about premature burial. The irony, unfortunately, is that this play indeed feels premature in its staging, and that's what buries it. Berger's central ...

  • Reviews

    Iphigeneia at Aulis

    Presented by and at The Pearl Theatre Company, 80 St. Mark's Place, NYC, Nov. 8-Dec. 16.

  • Reviews

    THE PRICE

    It's hard to resist the pull of the timeless individuals in Arthur Miller's enduring 1968 work, The Price. Like other classic Miller characters, their power to mesmerize is born of an indelible familiarity. With their melancholy pasts and bitter resentments revealed layer by layer—with heartbreaking but simple ...

  • Reviews

    AFRAID TO LOOK DOWN

    Life-as-theatre provides a very large stage, and, because of its universality, an empathetic audience. Cullen Douglas takes control of one excruciating year of his life by sharing it in a painfully honest one-person show. He takes us from his wife's first labor pains through the first year of the ...