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7 Easy Hacks for a Great Audition

7 Easy Hacks for a Great Audition
Photo Source: Photo by Brendan Church on Unsplash

You might be the most talented actor in the world but if you aren’t great at auditioning, you’ll probably have a hard time booking jobs. Learning the key to a great audition is essential to your survival in this industry.

After sitting on the other side of the casting table for thousands of projects, I’ve put together a list of seven easy hacks that could turn your auditions into bookings!

1. Know what to wear ahead of time.
Set aside a place in your closet for your go-to audition outfits so they’re ready to go at a moment’s notice. If you audition for “mom” roles all the time, put an outfit together that speaks to that. Same with a corporate look. They should be flattering (in color and style), comfortable, clean, and wrinkle-free so when you walk into the room, the client and casting director are impressed with your appearance right off the bat.

Also be sure to have an outfit that looks like your headshot (if not the same one you’re wearing in the headshot). Believe me, I’ll have clients ask for you to bring that exact wardrobe to set if you get booked!

2. Print out your headshots/resumes now.
I’ve heard it many times regarding an actor not having a resume or picture: “Sorry, my printer ran out of ink,” or “My printer died.” You never know when you’ll get your next call to audition so you have to be ready at all times. Have a stack of headshots ready to go at any given moment. Keep a stash in your car, in your handbag or briefcase so you have them ready when you run into Ron Howard at Starbucks...you never know!

3. Figure out GPS directions to the audition ahead of time.
As soon as you get the call, figure out how to get to the audition address. Plan out the parking situation or navigate the subway map immediately so you don’t have to worry about it when you’re en route. Being prepared will decrease the probability of any delays as you travel to the audition and increase your chances of arriving in plenty of time. You’re nervous enough as it is; do yourself a favor and take this worry out of the equation!

READ: 6 Things That Make CDs Happy (Other Than Donuts and Coffee)

4. Create a home “audition room.”
Set up a spot in your home that’s quiet where you can be all by yourself. This is your sanctuary, the spot in your home where you’ll work on your auditions, practice sides, experiment, and workshop material. It should be clean, organized, and clear of clutter that may distract from the task at hand.

5. Know two monologues—one dramatic, one comic—cold.
Be able to do them at the drop of a hat. I’ve had directors ask for additional monologues at auditions when they want to see something more than just the sides. These are your calling cards and are a must for every actor!

6. Keep track of all your auditions.
Note who the casting director, director, and producer were, along with the date. Note the role (or type of role). When the audition is over, record how you did or how you think it went. You can learn a lot from seeing what kinds of roles you’re being called in for and who’s been interested in seeing you. This is valuable information when it comes to submitting yourself for future roles.

7. Put some thank you cards in your audition bag with pre-stamped envelopes.
On the way home from your audition, jot a quick thank you and pop it in the mailbox. It really does mean a lot to us that you send a thank you note. We remember gratitude, trust me. And definitely send one if you book the job.

Being prepared is essential and will actually remove a lot of the anxiety from auditioning. With these easy hacks, you’ll be dressed to kill, have your pic/resumes ready, know where you’re going, and will be prepared and well-informed. Now all you have left to do is perform!

Melanie graduated from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts with a BFA in acting. She then started her own production company producing feature films, documentaries, and commercials in New York. In Los Angeles, she worked in business affairs at the talent agency Writers & Artists and then went on to work at The Firm, a celebrity management company. She is now head of casting at Mike Lemon Casting where has she cast nearly a thousand films, television shows and commercials, many receiving related awards.

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The views expressed in this article are solely that of the individual(s) providing them,
and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Backstage or its staff.

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