Editorial

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  • Advice

    Back Stage Addresses Audition Questions

    Welcome to our first-ever Audition Issue, which we hope addresses a number of common questions and obstacles that actors have in getting seen for roles.

  • Advice

    The Destination or the Journey

    Too many people in our culture spend their whole lives being miserable in jobs they hate because everything is about the destination and not the journey.

  • Advice

    How to Survive a Heatwave

    "I'm from Nebraska, which can get as equally hot and steamy, and I know there are only two ways to escape heat like this," says Unscripted blogger Emily Kinney. "The pool and air-conditioning."

  • Advice

    Serve No Review Before It's Time

    "Gentlemen's agreement" is an archaic term that is nevertheless perfect for describing the unwritten contract between publications and theater producers known as the "review embargo."

  • Advice

    Why Actors Should Join Twitter

    Social networking has become an important marketing tool for actors in recent years. Read Unscripted blogger Tamara Dhia as she offers solid advice to actors on the benefits of tweeting.

  • Advice

    Casting Directors Give Advice at Readers' Choice Panel (Video)

    Back Stage Features Writer Jessica Gardner moderates a panel with Readers' Choice Favorite Commercial Casting Director Francine Selkirk and Favorite TV Casting Director April Webster.

  • Advice

    To Be (an Actor) or Not to Be

    There comes a point in every struggling actor's career when they question whether they are on the right path. Trust me. I pretty much ask myself that every day (so do my parents).

  • Advice

    Broadway Takes Back the Tonys

    The 2011 ceremony marked the return of the Main Stem in a big way. Taking a page from "The Book of Mormon," the evening's biggest winner with nine awards, the ceremony didn't take itself too seriously.

  • Advice

    The Comedy and Drama of Emmy Categorization

    It's often a debate where to place a series in the Emmy categories. Sometimes, Emmy voters can look past the category and judge the performance not just by the amount of laughs or tears it elicits.

  • Advice

    It Takes a Village to Satisfy a Comedian

    It is a lot easier to make a room full of 500 people laugh than it is to make a handful of people, even if they are your friends, laugh.