25 On-the-Rise Performers You Need to Know in 2022

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Photo Source: Kristina Ruddick/KimNewMoney/Justin Bettman/Isaac Anthony

The actors featured in our 2021–22 Emerging Talent Portfolio are already running with the best of them. They’ve acted opposite some of today’s most reputable screen talents, and some are even garnering well-earned awards buzz. Learn about their tips for the audition room, the performances that inspired them, and what you can catch them in next. 

Moisés Arias (“Jockey”)
Arias stuns in Clint Bentley’s Sundance drama as a jockey on the rise going toe-to-toe with Clifton Collins Jr. as the man who may be his estranged father. An actor for 17 years who credits casting director Jory Weitz for helping him land his breakout role in “Nacho Libre” opposite Jack Black, it’s clear he’s got the range. (Self-portrait by Moisés Arias.)

What do you love most about being an actor? 
I love getting out of my own patterns. As an actor, you influence your mind, and your actions might follow accordingly.

What in your career are you most proud of and why? 
It’s difficult for actors who started very young to make transitions into adult roles. I was lucky enough at 18 [to do so] with ”The Kings of Summer.” That movie allowed me to see a team of people make a film with a small budget beautifully. 

What’s in the pipeline that you’re most excited about?
I get excited being a part of great stories. You never know from a script or director alone how the project may turn out. I hope to continue working with creative, brilliant people and am very excited about the films in [postproduction], as well as the ones just preparing to start.

 

Zackary Arthur (“Chucky”) 
At 15, Arthur already has nine years in the biz under his belt. Following scene-stealing roles on “Transparent” and “Kidding,” he makes his biggest splash to date as Jake Wheeler on USA Networks’ buzzy reboot, “Chucky.” (Photo by Lauren Desberg.)

What in your career are you most proud of thus far, and why? 
It’s interesting how much I learn from the characters I play. On “Chucky,” Jake is just so cool. I would be best friends with Jake in real life; it makes me proud thinking he might make a difference in someone’s life.

Who’s the casting director who gave you your first break, and what was the project? 
I am really thankful for all casting directors—and their casting assistants. They work really hard to make sure we get seen for the roles. This has been a nine-year journey so far. There are three casting directors I want to thank: Bonnie Zane for “Chucky,” Francine Maisler for “The 5th Wave,” and Eyde Belasco for “Transparent.” 

What’s your No. 1 piece of audition advice? 
Don’t worry what audition it is or if you get the role. [No matter what,] you’re getting a chance to meet a casting director.

 

Dyllón Burnside (“Thoughts of a Colored Man,” “Pose”)
Since his screen debut on “High Maintenance” seven years ago, Burnside has become a Ryan Murphy regular on “American Horror Stories” and as fan favorite Ricky on the boundary-pushing “Pose.” He returned to Broadway this fall in “Thoughts of a Colored Man.” (Photo by Greg Vaughan.)

Which casting director gave you your first big break, and what was the project? 
David Caparelliotis picked me out of an open call and put me in front of Kenny Leon to play a lead in the Broadway musical “Holler if Ya Hear Me,” which kick-started my acting career. And Alexa Fogel cast “Pose.” She saw me when I was in “Holler” and has supported me and my work ever since.

How do you stay creatively fulfilled outside of acting?
I get outside as much as I can, put my feet in the grass, soak in the ocean, feel the sun on my face. I’ve also found designing floral arrangements to be a really beautiful creative outlet that I can do just for me and sometimes share with loved ones. It’s like painting with the Earth’s color palette.

 

Darby Camp (“Clifford the Big Red Dog”)
Viewers will remember the preternaturally mature Camp as one of Reese Witherspoon’s daughters on HBO’s Emmy-winning “Big Little Lies.” She’s not all grown up—but she’s getting there, as seen in the new live-action feature “Clifford.”  (Photo by Emily Sandifer.)

What do you love most about being an actor? 
I love that acting lets me travel and see different parts of the world and meet different types of people. 

What in your career are you most proud of thus far, and why? 
I am most proud of having shared the screen with so many talented actors. It’s been an honor to watch and learn from literal legends. I am very fortunate that so many of them have taken the time to really invest in me and my career—I recognize what a gift that is and have learned so much from them.

What’s a screen performance that inspires you as an actor? 
Kate Winslet as Rose in “Titanic,” because she’s so amazing. But also because I love period clothing! I would love to do a movie like that. It’s fiction during a historical event, so you can improvise and be creative while still learning an important story about the past. And of course, young Leo DiCaprio is just dreamy.

 

Danielle Campbell (“Trouble in Mind”) 
Having worked consistently on the small screen on series including Paramount+’s “Tell Me a Story” and Freeform’s “Famous in Love,” Campbell makes her Broadway debut in Roundabout Theatre Company’s “Trouble in Mind.” She’s particularly thrilled to be sharing the stage with Tony winner LaChanze, “and to watch her formidable portrayal of Wiletta Mayer.” (Photo by Justin Bettman.)

What’s in the pipeline that you’re most excited about? 
The play I’m working on right now has me giddy with excitement! We’ve worked tirelessly to do the playwright, Alice Childress, justice. “Trouble In Mind” is a play within a play that looks at ego, prejudice, and identity in the world of New York theater; It’s both baffling and heartbreaking to acknowledge just how relevant this story still is today. 

What’s your No. 1 piece of audition advice?
Have fun with the audition and make it your own. Whether you’re self-taping or in-person, everyone will have something different that makes them special. Get off-book, prepare who you believe the character to be, and have fun! Every audition is an opportunity to learn something about yourself and to play within a new world.

 

Brady Dalton Richards (“Harry Potter and the Cursed Child”)
Richards was supposed to make their Broadway debut as Scorpius Malfoy in “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” in March of 2020—however, a certain global pandemic prevented it. At last, they now take the stage at the Lyric Theatre. (Photo by Jon Taylor.)

What’s in the pipeline that you’re most excited about? 
“Harry Potter and the Cursed Child,” baby. I’m finally stepping into this thing, for which I’ve been mentally preparing for the better part of two years (and also my whole life, to an extent). It’s my Broadway debut; it’s a new version of a beloved story; it’s this massive franchise that’s deeply personal to so many. It’s all quite big-feeling and unreal. My old pals, imposter syndrome and anxious insecurity, slip in more than I’d like, but those are all part of it, I think. They’re shades of excitement.

Who’s the casting director who gave you your first break, and what was the project? 
Nearly four years ago, Susan Vash and her team ushered me through a complete fever dream casting process, culminating in my first—and only—“successful” pilot season. The project was called “Glamorous.” It was written by Jordon Nardino, produced by Damon Wayans Jr. and Kameron Tarlow’s Two Shakes production banner, and it was directed by Eva freaking Longoria Bastón. The thing didn’t end up going after all, but it was the most beautiful experience. 

 

Michela De Rossi (“The Many Saints of Newark”)
When David Chase comes knocking, you answer. The creator of “The Sopranos” plucked De Rossi from her native Rome to play the female lead of his prequel film, “The Many Saints of Newark,” and her heartbreaking performance has all the signs of being a star-making one. (Photo by Giorgio Codazzi.)

What’s a screen performance that inspires you as an actor? 
Marion Cotillard playing Edith Piaf in “La Vie en rose.” She is one of my favorite artists. Something that fascinates me is when an actor completely changes themselves⁠—from the physical appearance to the way they move and talk. I love biopics for this reason. 

What’s your No. 1 piece of audition advice? 
I would say to not prepare yourself for the character, just be ready to do everything. Be focused, not concentrated. 

What’s in the pipeline that you’re most excited about? 
I am in a transitory period. I did an American movie, and I worked in Italy at the same time. So now I am like, “What should I do now?” It is so exciting, because opportunities are coming and I have to make choices, which is a true privilege.

 

Elliot Fletcher (“Y: The Last Man”)
Previously known for his work on “Faking It,” “Shameless,” and “The Fosters,” Fletcher steals the show in this post-apocalyptic comic book series from showrunner Eliza Clark. Centered on a future where only one cisgender man remains on Earth, Sam is an artist and the lone survivor’s best friend—a transgender role written specifically for this much-loved (but, for now, dearly departed) sci-fi adaptation. (Photo by Irvin Rivera.)

​​What do you love most about being an actor? 
Getting to know other people through myself. I am always happiest when I’m working, building someone new. 

What in your career are you most proud of thus far, and why? 
I think I’m just proud of my growth as an actor and as a human. I feel like I’ve learned a lot in the last five years, and that’s been a privilege. 

What’s a screen performance that inspires you as an actor? 
Ewan McGregor in “The Ghost Writer” is really incredible. The subtlety he brings to his work is something I really wish I could achieve. Also, can I brag about a friend for a second? Marin Ireland on “Y: The Last Man” is so present and real. It’s a real honor to have been able to watch and work with her. 

 

Jojo Gibbs (“Twenties”) 
Not many actors can say their first audition led to a leading role on a BET series, but comedian-turned-actor Gibbs sure can—and she knows exactly who to thank for that. Catch her next in the stacked cast of Celine Song’s “Past Lives.” (Photo by Matt Easton.) 

Who’s the casting director who gave you your first break, and what was the project? 
Junie Lowry Johnson and Libby Goldstein! I will never forget these two amazing women. Not only did they give me my first break, they were my first audition experience ever. My audition for “Twenties” was my first audition, and it was a once-in-a-lifetime experience.  

What’s your No. 1 piece of audition advice?
Try not to overthink it or stress. Do your best work and let it go. 

In what ways do you stay creatively fulfilled outside of acting?
I also do standup comedy, which is my first love. I love being onstage and using my own words to express myself. It’s one of the highest forms of joy for me, but felt fleeting when COVID-19 happened. I’ve started writing more and focusing on creative outlets that I can be sure are available to me at any time. 

 

Carlacia Grant (“Outer Banks”) 
Grant burst onto the scene on the History Channel’s 2016 remake of “Roots” and has been going nonstop ever since. She can most recently be seen as the ever-cunning Cleo on Season 2 of Netflix’s runaway hit “Outer Banks.” (Photo by Boerge Seirigk.)

What do you love most about being an actor?
I love how I can literally be whoever I want. I have the ability to transcend what is possible, at least for the human imagination. For one role I can be in space, the next 2,000 years into the future, the next in the 1600s. My imagination gets to run wild.  

What in your career are you most proud of thus far, and why?
The character Irene that I played on “Roots.” I got to be a part of such an iconic series that tells the story of a relentless race. Also, researching for that role, I got to learn a lot of African American history. 

What’s a screen performance that inspires you as an actor? 
Lupita Nyong’o in “Us.” I was amazed by how perfectly she executed playing two characters while still playing opposite herself.

 

Devery Jacobs (“Reservation Dogs”)
As Elora Danan Postoak on Sterlin Harjo and Taika Waititi’s freshman dramedy on FX, Jacobs is helping move the needle for Indigenous representation onscreen. It helps, too, that her work is sublime—and now Gotham Award–nominated! (Photo by Kristina Ruddick.)

What’s your No. 1 piece of audition advice? 
Creatively get your own rocks off. Do the scene and performance in a way that feels truthful and right to you, rather than an idea of what the casting director wants. If you’re acting for yourself, that’s where your work will resonate the deepest. 

What do you love most about being an actor? 
There are so many aspects about being an actor that I love, but I think the thing I love most is being able to travel to different parts of the world and meet new people who I get to collaborate with. 

Who’s the casting director who gave you your first break, and what was the project? 
The casting director who gave me my first break was Rene Haynes, for my first leading role of Aila in an indie feature film called “Rhymes for Young Ghouls.” It was the first time I’d worked with an Indigenous writer-director, Jeff Barnaby, and the project changed my life and career. I wouldn’t be acting today if it weren’t for Jeff and Rene. 

 

Dallas Liu (“PEN15,” “Avatar: The Last Airbender”)
As the brooding (and at times bullying) older brother to Maya Erskine’s baby-faced middle-schooler, Liu is always a welcome presence on Hulu’s beloved “PEN15.” We’re particularly excited to see him shine on Netflix’s live-action adaptation of “Avatar: The Last Airbender” as Prince Zuko. (Photo by Jonny Marlow.)

What in your career are you most proud of and why? 
Zuko has the emotional journey that I’ve been wanting for so long. He has super cool firebending abilities and is 100% my favorite character in the entire series. 

Which casting director gave you your first big break, and what was the project? 
I’d really like to thank Suzanne Goddard-Smythe, because she always supported me in my early years of acting. I was able to get my face out a lot more in the industry [on series like “No Good Nick” and “The Who Was? Show”] because of her. 

What’s a screen performance that inspires you as an actor?
Recently, I felt really inspired by Jung Hoyeon on “Squid Game.” I thought she did an amazing job making the entire audience attached to her emotionally. Every time she came on the screen, I got extremely excited for her character, and I hope I’m able
to do the same [for audiences] in the future.

 

Kiana Madeira (“Fear Street”)
Previously known for her work on teen drama “Trinkets,” Madeira led the cast of Netflix’s spooktacular horror film trilogy “Fear Street” this year and proved herself to be a major screen talent to watch. (Photo by Brendan Wixted.)

What do you love most about being an actor? 
The society that we are living in hardly encourages humans to investigate and dig deep [into] our emotions. Being an actor allows me to explore my emotions and thoughts, and through that, provides me with new perspectives. 

What in your career are you most proud of and why? 
Through my faith in God and the beautiful people surrounding me, I have managed to care for myself in ways that are constructive and elevating. I have overcome a lot of self-doubt and insecurities. 

What’s your No. 1 piece of audition advice? 
Have fun! Make bold choices. Create a character that you feel resonates with you through wardrobe, body language, hair and makeup, voice. Bring a childlike curiosity when you are auditioning, and remember that there is no one else like you in the world, so bring your own perspective and ideas. You are so special.

 

Mark McKenna (“One of Us Is Lying,” “Dali Land”)
McKenna adds not one but two high-profile projects to his résumé this year: Peacock mystery series “One of Us Is Lying” and the forthcoming “Dali Land,” in which he portrays legendary rocker Alice Cooper. How’s that for range? (Photo by Derek Despain.)

What’s your No. 1 piece of audition advice?
Be on time, be off-book, say the lines, leave. 

In what ways do you stay creatively fulfilled outside of acting?
Music and photography take up most of my time outside of acting. Music has always been a very big part of my life. Learning how to produce music during lockdown kept me busy most days. I firmly believe every actor should have a hobby outside of acting. It’s great for staying creatively fulfilled when you’re not working. 

What’s in the pipeline that you’re most excited about?
“Dali Land,” in which I play Alice Cooper. I had never played someone who actually exists before, so getting to study his mannerisms through old footage and interviews was a fun challenge.

 

Harrison Osterfield (“The Irregulars”)
A graduate of the famed BRIT School and the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art, Osterfield made his leading player debut on Netflix’s hit “The Irregulars” as fish-out-of-water Leopold, a role he says has been his “favorite part to play so far.” (Photo by Rosie Mattheson.)

What in your career are you most proud of and why?
My first job on “Catch-22” with George Clooney is definitely up there. We shot this one scene over three days in a tin can of a plane in Rome, and it was boiling! Full costume, loads of prosthetics, hot studio lights—and I also had to be crying my eyes out for each of the days. It was exhausting, but I’m really proud of the performance, and it’s one I’ll always remember.

What’s a screen performance that inspires you as an actor?
Daniel Day-Lewis in “There Will Be Blood” blew me away. That’s the kind of work that I hope to emulate throughout my career. 

What’s in the pipeline that you’re most excited about?
I’m just going through the motions with auditioning at the moment. Outside of that, I’m doing some cool work with my mates from school on our sustainability company Carbon Fingerprint, where we are doing some great work to contribute toward saving the planet by planting trees all around the world.

 

Danielle Pinnock (“Ghosts”)
You’ve likely spotted Pinnock on the small screen before, popping up on “Scandal,” “This Is Us,” and “Young Sheldon.” Now, as Alberta on CBS’ “Ghosts,” she gets to portray a “brassy hot mess with a heart of gold.” We’d say she’s right where she belongs. (Photo by KimNewMoney.)

What do you love most about being an actor? 
There is nothing like an actor’s hustle. Our lives are exhilarating, wild, and truly out-of-the-box. Being an actor has made me a stronger writer and collaborator. Although the life of an actor has its highs and lows, there’s nothing else I’d rather be doing.

What’s a screen performance that inspires you as an actor? 
I live by the quote: “What would Whoopi do?” Whoopi Goldberg is one of the most transformative actors of our time. 

Who’s the casting director who gave you your first break, and what was the project? 
Adam Belcuore at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago cast me as an understudy in “By the Way, Meet Vera Stark.” I used to work as a casting intern for the Goodman, so Adam and I became dear friends during that time. When I finished grad school, I needed a job ASAP, and he allowed me to work on that show. That was my first Equity job.

 

Jessica Plummer (“The Girl Before”)
Having gotten her start as a performer as part of British girl group Neon Jungle, Plummer has also appeared on the U.K. soap “EastEnders.” She’s poised for her biggest break to date with HBO Max’s “The Girl Before,” on which she’ll star opposite Gugu Mbatha-Raw and David Oyelowo. (Photo by Michael Shelford.)

What’s your No. 1 piece of audition advice? 
Own it! This is your time and opportunity to show off your version of a character you’ve brought to life. There are no wrong options until you’re given direction, so just breathe and try to have fun. 

In what ways do you stay creatively fulfilled outside of acting? 
I love trying new things and am pretty game for anything, especially if it involves other people: cooking, swimming, running, dancing. Human connection is something I never want to take for granted, especially after the couple of years we have had. 

What’s in the pipeline that you’re most excited about? 
Being able to finally share the finished product of the hard work of so many people creating “The Girl Before.” I am so incredibly proud.

 

Reneé Rapp (“The Sex Lives of College Girls”)
Rapp went from taking top prize at the 2018 Jimmy Awards to starring on Broadway as Regina George in “Mean Girls.” Now, she’s making her screen acting debut on HBO Max’s highly anticipated sex-positive series. (Photo by Amanda Delgadillo.)

What’s your No. 1 piece of audition advice? 
Throw everything you’ve been told out the window. Enter into spaces authentically and navigate the room as your full self—whatever that looks like that day. The universe has got your back. If something is meant for you, it will not pass you by. Be prepared, and take risks. 

How do you stay creatively fulfilled outside of acting? 
Music has guided me through life and has been my saving grace time and time again without fail. Singing is the one arena where I feel like I have the world at my fingertips. I also like to cry. Crying feels creative for some reason. 

What’s in the pipeline that you’re most excited about? 
I’ve been writing and in the studio since I was in high school, and I can’t wait to share that part of me. My music is a reflection of my innermost thoughts and fears, so my hope is that one day, when I’m performing live, it will be like a big group therapy session.

 

Michael Hsu Rosen (“Pretty Smart”)
New York theater audiences have been watching Rosen onstage for years. Though his latest project, Netflix’s “Pretty Smart,” cast him as a social media influencer, the actor’s trying more than ever to live in the real-life here and now. (Photo by Isaac Anthony.)

What do you love most about being an actor?
I love acting for the same reason I love talking to people: Every once in a while, you manage to say exactly what you mean and the other person laughs or nods or claps back in a way that makes you feel perfectly understood.  

What in your career are you most proud of thus far, and why?
Two things: I’ve gotten to play lots of different characters in lots of different kinds of projects and, it would seem, occasionally defied people’s expectations. The second is that I try hard to be a force for kindness and respect on set. I am immensely grateful that I get to be an actor, and the more opportunities I get, the more effort I put into bringing that gratitude with me to work every day.  

What’s a screen performance that inspires you as an actor?
I finally got around to watching “Sound of Metal” the other day, and I can’t stop thinking about Riz Ahmed’s face—it’s just so beautiful and expressive.

 

Filippo Scotti (“The Hand of God”)
Filmmaker Paolo Sorrentino’s most personal movie yet wouldn’t have stuck the landing without the right lead performer; Scotti grounds the Italian coming-of-age drama in sincerity. (Photo by Mattia Cecchetti.)

What do you love most about being an actor? 
I think an actor is an observer. I really like to study other people’s gazes. I think that watching others is important to better understand oneself, just like one does when reading a book or watching a movie. 

What’s a screen performance that inspires you as an actor? 
I really like the scene where Charles Denner speaks to the woman on the switchboard in “L’homme Qui Aimait les Femmes” by François Truffaut. The desire in his gaze captures me and excites me every time I look at him.

What’s your No. 1 piece of audition advice? 
I often went to auditions with a mild memory [of the sides] to be able to do the scene more spontaneously. The truth is that behind almost all spontaneous things, there is a lot of work. And this, in my opinion, must never be forgotten.

 

Saniyya Sidney (“King Richard”)
Sidney had quite the (tennis) shoes to fill in telling the origin story of record-smashing legend Venus Williams, opposite Will Smith. Her portrayal of the sports superstar’s formative years is as impressive as it is inspiring. (Photo by John Jay.)

Which casting director gave you your first big break, and what was the project?
The incredible Victoria Thomas gave me my first three big breaks! My very first role as young Kizzy on “Roots,” and my very first two movie roles: “Fences” and “Hidden Figures.” My first time to the Academy Awards was for both of those movies. We won the [best ensemble] SAG Award for “Hidden Figures.” She really understands the craft and looks for truthful performances.

How do you stay creatively fulfilled outside of acting?
I have the great blessing of an acting tribe. I have been with them for most of my life. We sharpen each other’s swords. Last year when we couldn’t get together in person, our acting coach assigned the greatest films from the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s. We would Zoom and break down a film from a director and writer’s perspective. It was really a game-changer for all of us. When you stop labeling yourself as just an actor and expand into being a storyteller, you access your creativity from a higher place and purpose. 

What’s in the pipeline that you’re most excited about?
Sharing the screen again with my “Fences” mama, the incomparable Viola Davis, on “The First Lady.”

 

Suzanna Son (“Red Rocket”) 
Son is generating early awards buzz for her turn as Strawberry in Sean Baker’s “Red Rocket”—so it’s just a little surprising that the film was her first acting job ever. Of course, given that Baker is known for plucking “real people” to inhabit his films, it’s no wonder he and his latest muse made cinematic magic onscreen. (Photo provided by Graham Dunn for FOXES Magazine.)

What’s a screen performance that inspires you as an actor? 
Mike Myers in any of the “Austin Powers” movies. Really checks off all the boxes for me. I never knew he played both Austin and Dr. Evil until I rewatched them as an adult. Mike is incredible! He inspires me to act with my entire body—mojo and all. 

What in your career are you most proud of thus far, and why? 
I’m most proud of the singing I did in “Red Rocket.” That was my first day of shooting and it was so scary.

What’s your No. 1 piece of audition advice? 
Stay hydrated, if only to outlive your enemies.

Who’s the casting director who gave you your first break, and what was the project? 
Sean Baker! For the film “Red Rocket.” 

 

Momona Tamada (“The Baby-Sitters Club”)
From two seasons on “The Baby-Sitters Club” to her recurring role in the “To All the Boys” film franchise, Tamada is making herself right at home onscreen. Catch her next opposite Owen Wilson, Jesse Williams, and Michael Peña in the 2022 feature “Secret Headquarters.” (Photo by Jonny Marlow.)

What in your career are you most proud of and why? 
Honestly, I would say everything. I think it’s important to recognize each step I’ve taken to get where I am today and to express gratitude toward it all. 

What’s a screen performance that inspires you as an actor? 
Natalie Portman in “Léon: The Professional.” I gained an incredible amount of inspiration from her performance.

How do you stay creatively fulfilled outside of acting? 
I love to bake but often resort to drawing and painting as another way of expression. That is something [my “Baby-Sitters Club” character] Claudia Kishi taught me more about.

 

Marianly Tejada (“One of Us Is Lying”)
After hustling for years with gigs on “Orange Is the New Black” and “The Purge,” Tejada was due for a big juicy role. She gets just that as the brainy Bronwyn Rojas on Peacock’s thriller “One of Us Is Lying.” (Photo by Jenna Jones.)

What’s your No. 1 piece of audition advice? 
Do it as much as you possibly can. The more you do it, the more comfortable you are in your own skin and the more savvy you become at utilizing your strengths. For self-tapes, read with fellow actors (if possible) whom you like working with.

What’s a screen performance that inspires you as an actor? 
Marion Cotillard in “La Vie en rose.” It is one of the most touching, heartbreaking, and impeccable performances I’ve ever seen. I can’t begin to imagine the challenge of playing a real-life icon with an incredibly complex and turbulent life.

What in your career are you most proud of thus far, and why? 
In general, I’m proud to have pursued acting and persevered in a field where there’s no formula or certainty of an outcome. I’m proud to have listened to my inner voice and honored that calling.

 

Lydia West (“It’s a Sin”)
Russell T. Davies isn’t the only person taking notice of West’s incredible talent. The star of his miniseries “Years and Years” and “It’s a Sin” has proven to be a riveting screen presence time and again. (Photo by Wolf Marlow.)

What in your career are you most proud of and why?
“It’s a Sin” was particularly special, as it’s not often that a piece of work can be a poster [for] public health. Being part of something that affected a wide audience and contributed to breaking down prejudice and opening conversations about HIV/AIDS was truly special.

What’s in the pipeline that you’re most excited about?
I’m excited for a few projects out next year: “The Pentaverate” on Netflix sees Mike Myers at his finest. Another drama I’ve recently wrapped is “Inside Man” by the amazing Steven Moffat, with Stanley Tucci and David Tennant. Also, I can’t wait for everyone to see “Text for You,” a romantic comedy with Celine Dion!

 

This story originally appeared in the Nov. 18 issue of Backstage Magazine. Subscribe here.

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Benjamin Lindsay
Benjamin Lindsay is managing editor at Backstage, where if you’re reading it in our magazine, he’s written or edited it first. He’s also producer and host of a number of our digital interview series, including our inaugural on-camera segment, Backstage Live.
See full bio and articles here!
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Casey Mink
Casey Mink is the senior staff writer at Backstage. When she's not writing about television, film, or theater, she is definitely somewhere watching it.
See full bio and articles here!

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