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  • News

    Daily Dispatch: March 30, 2001

    End-of-the-Week Roundup: 'Wit,' 'Pollock,' Etc.

  • News

    How To Get an Agent?

    How do you get an agent interested in you? (And other important questions...)

  • News

    <b>Actors don't want strike, SAG's negotiator insists</b>

    The Screen Actors Guild is not hankering for a strike against the film and TV industry this summer, according to Brian Walton, the guild's chief negotiator.

  • News

    The Wicked Stage

    A final word on the Knightsbridge controversy, in which the scrappy Pasadena-and-L.A. theatre company purportedly banned critic Anne Louise Bannon for her negative views of the company. The Knightsbridge denies there was a ban, but pointed out that Bannon has shown a bias against the theatre.

  • News

    Proof

    "Proof," by David Auburn, has transferred from the Manhattan Theater Club to the Walter Kerr Theatre, to test whether Broadway can support a small (single set, cast of four), quiet, adroitly constructed, intense, intelligent, beautiful play.

  • News

    The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe

    Lily Tomlin is a wonder. Reprising her one-woman triumph, "The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe," 15 years after she debuted the Jane Wagner-penned show on Broadway, Tomlin is better and bolder than ever.

  • News

    A Class Act

    "It's all in the songs," pleads Ed Kleban. "Just listen to my songs."

  • News

    Momma

    Sioban Fallon's one-woman show allows the versatile actress to display her comedic character acting skills while telling the simple, heartfelt story of a mother's journey from conception to childbirth.

  • News

    Forbidden Broadway 2001: A Spoof Odyssey

    "Forbidden Broadway" is the theatrical equivalent of a floating crap game, with the emphasis very definitely on the crap. The ultimate insider show, this sly and slicing send-up of all things Broadway is in its 18th hilarious year.

  • News

    Judgment at Nuremberg

    All comparisons are odious and inevitable. When viewing the National Actors Theatre's new stage adaptation of 'Judgment at Nuremberg,' it's impossible to block out the 1961 original film version.